Open Access Week 2021: Journal Hosting

Welcome to this fourth special blog post celebrating International Open Access Week 2021. Today’s post will highlight an additional service available from the RGU Library, which can help members of the university to run their own journal. You can also find a link to today’s minigame at the bottom of the post. If you have any general questions or want to get in touch, contact us by email at publications@rgu.ac.uk. If you’d instead like to talk to us about hosting your own journal, then please contact the Journals@RGU service (journalhosting@rgu.ac.uk).

Journal Hosting

The Journals@RGU website (https://journals.rgu.ac.uk/) is based on a platform called “Open Journal Systems” (OJS). OJS is used by many organisations across the world to publish online journals, particularly open access journals. The platform includes functionality for receiving article submissions, allocating peer reviewers, recording discussions during copyediting, assigning articles to issues and then publishing issues online. We have also configured our OJS platform to create digital object identifiers (DOIs) for published articles, making it easier to cite content from our journals.

RGU’s first journal, Communicare (https://journals.rgu.ac.uk/communicare), produced a couple of issues in 2014-2015, but is not currently active. However, we have recently helped Dr. Konstantina Martzoukou and Professor Peter Reid from the School of Creative and Cultural Business (CCB) to set up a new journal, Reflective Professional (https://journals.rgu.ac.uk/REF-PRO). This is intended to be an annual publication, the first issue of which was published in June 2021.

Reflective Professional is primarily a venue for the publication of high-quality work by RGU’s students of information management. The inaugural issue centres around several recent and noteworthy dissertations, accompanied by shorter articles from some alumni and an editorial from the joint editors. The journal is also intended to be a project opportunity for current students, so each year one or two information management students will be working as assistant editors on the forthcoming issue for that year.

See below for a statement from the editors on their experience of working with Journals@RGU to set up Reflective Professional:

We were delighted to be able to collaborate with the library on the creation of our student-led open access journal. The experience students gain as part of a master’s research project forms a core aspect of their learning journey. It helps them to develop diverse skills, including: academic writing, data collection and analysis, interpersonal skills, critical evaluation, communication, data management, knowledge organisation, presentation and ethics. However, taught-course master’s research does not form part of the research outputs of an academic institution, except for those works that are selectively published in academic journals or presented at conferences. Reflective Professional therefore provides our students with the opportunity to publish their own work in a fully open access journal.

A number of students were involved in the editorial team and found the experience “invaluable, as it provided an opportunity to work in editorial and proofreading work, which contributed to the development of skills that can be used in the future, as well as when pursuing the master thesis”. Another student noted that “this project was a great opportunity to assist with the starting of a new journal. As a student soon to start their dissertation, it was fascinating to read what others have written about. Also, from a skills perspective, it was also good to see other, less traditional applications of library and information science skills.”

Setting up the journal on the Open Journal Systems (OJS) platform has been a great way for us to reach out to a global academic audience. The platform also offers an intuitive way of supporting the whole editorial process. We were delighted with invaluable support offered by the library’s Journals@RGU team (led by George Bray and Colin MacLean), who provided first-rate technical assistance, student training, guidance on copyright, and expertise on the look and design of the journal website.  We look forward to continuing our close working relationship with the library team.

Dr. Konstantina Martzoukou and Prof. Peter Reid (CCB)

If you would like to know more about the Journals@RGU service, or if you have an idea for a journal and would like to discuss it with us, get in touch by contacting journalhosting@rgu.ac.uk.

Minigame

Today’s game is “Label the Benefits of Open Access”, in which your goal is to match up the labels to the correct images on the infographic. You can access the game here: https://puzzel.org/en/label-this/play?p=-Mk1LJMKgmOcS2nD0Ag6

Open Access Week 2021: Research Data

Welcome to our third blog post for International Open Access Week 2021. This week’s post will focus on research data management. You can also find a link to today’s minigame at the bottom of the post. If you have any questions or want to get in touch, contact us by email at publications@rgu.ac.uk.

Research Data

Giving a definitive definition of research data is difficult, as what you call it depends on your discipline. For example, humanities scholars may refer to primary sources or texts; in the social sciences, researchers may instead talk about survey results, interview analysis or statistics; whereas academics in STEM subjects may use various other terms to describe the methodologies and results of their experiments. One useful and fairly general definition is provided by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (https://epsrc.ukri.org/about/standards/researchdata/scope/): “recorded factual material commonly retained by and accepted in the scientific community as necessary to validate research findings”, where the “scientific community” refers to many kinds of researchers – not just to those in STEM fields.

Increasing numbers of funders, research organisations and publishers now require effective management of research data. The ultimate goal is to enhance knowledge discovery and innovation by making research data as easy to access and use as possible. The COVID-19 pandemic has shown how the sharing of data and research have become vital for the development of vaccinations; without existing support for sharing of research data, our gradual return to a more ‘normal’ life might have been significantly slower! Who knows how today’s research data and infrastructure might be built upon and re-used tomorrow?

FAIR Data

Although it is relatively easy to find relevant data in our digital age, there are still a number of obstacles to consider. Locating data requires successful discovery and retrieval mechanisms, such as well-maintained databases and high-quality metadata. Datasets also need to be downloadable in a format that can be easily accessed. Additionally, there need to be clear guidelines on what a user is allowed to do with the data once they’ve obtained it, for example through some sort of licence.

These challenges prompted a workshop in 2014, which ultimately produced what are now referred to as the “FAIR Guiding Principles“. The FAIR principles state that all research data should be:

  • Findable. It should be possible for both humans and machines to easily discover data (and metadata).
  • Accessible. It should be very clear how to access the data.
  • Interoperable. Data should be provided in a way that makes it easy to use in other systems or alongside other data.
  • Reusable. Data should be well-described with appropriate metadata, so that the data can be interpreted properly. There should also be very clear terms of use for the data.

Data Management and Open Data

When starting a research project, you may find it invaluable to create a data management plan (DMP). DMPs help researchers to think about their intentions for organising, storing and curating the data that they will create during their research. DMPonline is one of many resources that offers templates to help write your own DMP, in a way that comply with institutional or funder requirements. You can find more information in our online guide.

When it comes to sharing your data with others after the end of a project, the best way to do this is by archiving your data in a repository. A number of such repositories are listed in the Registry of Research Data Repositories, but a few particularly relevant examples are listed below:

  • Figshare (https://figshare.com/). A generic repository. Uploaded works will be given a digital object identifier (DOI). Free accounts can upload files of up to 5 GB in size.
  • Zenodo (https://zenodo.org/). A generic repository associated with the Europe-based OpenAIRE network. Uploaded works will be given a DOI. In general, files can be up to 50 GB in size, but larger files can be accommodated on request.
  • GitHub (https://github.com/). A software repository and development platform. Free accounts can upload files of up to 500 MB in size.

You can also archive data on OpenAIR (https://openair.rgu.ac.uk/), RGU’s institutional repository. Dataset records can include standalone datasets, supplementary data or even data articles. Additionally, if you prefer to host the actual data files elsewhere, the a “link-only” record can be created, which helps to increase the discoverability of your data. Some examples of existing datasets include:

  1. Software-related data from the School of Computing
  1. A data article from the School of Engineering
  1. Multimedia appendices of a thesis from the School of Creative and Cultural Business

If you’d like to discuss archiving or documenting your research data in OpenAIR, then please get in touch with the Publications Team. You can also contact Jane Williams if you have any other questions about research data management.

Minigame

Today’s minigame involves matching images to their corresponding descriptions, with each pair of cards having something to do with Open Access. How quickly can you match each image with its description? You can access the game here: https://puzzel.org/en/matching-pairs/play?p=-MlC6aYr8vX55gd5PVDM

If you have enjoyed our minigames this week, why not try these other data-themed games?

  • Research Data Management Adventure. A self-paced text adventure created by the University of Bath.
  • Data Horror Escape Room. A digital “escape room” created by the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam.
  • DANS Data Game. A multiplayer card-game created by Data Archiving and Networked Services (DANS). Based on “Quartets”, where you try to collect sets of four cards. Works best if you arrange to play this with two or three other people at the same time, with each person accessing the website separately (e.g. on their own computers).

Open Access Week 2021: Practice-Based Research

Welcome to our second blog post for International Open Access Week 2021. This week’s post looks at the topic of practice-based research, which is particularly common in the arts and social sciences. You can also find a link to today’s minigame at the bottom of the post. If you have any questions or want to get in touch, contact us by email at publications@rgu.ac.uk.

Practice-Based Research

Generally, practice-based research (also known as “practice research”, “practice as research” and “practice-led research”) refers to research that is undertaken through creative practices and processes. The various terms used to describe this phenomenon help to “characterise the way in which practice can result in research insights, such as those that arise out of making a creative work and/or in the documentation and theorisation of that work” (Smith and Dean 2009, page 2). At RGU, practice-based research is particularly common among researchers in Gray’s School of Art (GSA) and the Scott Sutherland School of Architecture and Built Environment (SSS), where it often takes various forms, such as artworks, creative writing, designs, exhibitions and performances.

The nature of practice-based research outputs means that they can be more challenging to document on research information systems and repositories (like Worktribe and OpenAIR at RGU), because these databases are primarily designed with publication-based outputs in mind. In response to these challenges, the Publications Team work closely with RGU’s practice-based researchers in an effort to ensure that their work is just as well-documented, discoverable and accessible as that of other researchers. For example, here are a selection of testimonials from some of the researchers whose practice-based research has been shared on OpenAIR:

My research practice is based on my own work as a curator and writer, on subjects focusing on art and activism, and post-socialist transformation, in the countries of the former Yugoslavia, as well as Belarus, Moldova, Russia and the Baltic States. The OpenAIR service at RGU has been tremendous in helping me to record and systematise what has been a pretty diverse body of work – across books, published papers, book chapters and exhibitions – since I joined RGU in 2014.

Maintaining this level of output on top of teaching and management commitments can be trying, so I have found the responsible staff really helpful and responsive to any queries. Requests for things to be uploaded to a professional standard have been turned around within a day, so the team can deliver results to very short deadlines. The OpenAIR service was also invaluable in putting together the Gray’s School of Art contribution to REF; we were able to track engagement and impact with outputs very readily, which is now crucial for us in demonstrating to reach and significance of our research.

My experiences with OpenAIR colleagues at RGU have been nothing but positive, and they are always on hand to ensure that a sometimes arcane and hard to grasp set of regulations and requirements can be navigated with ease.

Dr. Jon Blackwood (GSA) – Link to outputs on OpenAIR

In my work as an artist and anthropologist, my research, teaching and public work combine and explore the borders of art, anthropology, and philosophy, in practice and theory. Many of the projects I am part of result in publications that are experimental, and include work associated with exhibitions and screenings, as well as: creative writing in collections produced by artist-academics; collaboratively written ‘digital artefacts’ that merge experimental visual work with anthropological writing for online journals; co-authored, multi-vocal interviews and essays published alongside collaboratively produced art films for art audiences (rather than academics); and podcasts.

For all of these ‘outputs’, the Publications Team have actively and enthusiastically sought to record and make this material available. The team always address ethical issues, such as around permissions and open access, which they clearly are supportive of, and always work with the user/reader of the repository in mind, as well as the author/maker. I have found the team to be quick to respond, open-minded about formats and precise about detail. A fantastic team!

Dr. Jen Clarke (GSA) – Link to outputs on OpenAIR

I would like to highlight the perceived difficulty (or complexity) for articulating practice-based or led design outputs, especially with regards to their equitable inclusion on OpenAIR alongside more traditional ‘academic’ outputs. The Publications Team have supported me endlessly in articulating how practice-based design contributes to architectural research and to RGU’s strategic plan for research. As such, I am now becoming more adept at understanding how best to convey the worth and potential contribution of these outputs in a way that ‘the academy’ can appreciate.

I am particularly happy with the enormous help provided by the Publications Team in coming up with portfolio-style solutions for documenting my design outputs on OpenAIR. Some particular examples include: “Demonstrating the ‘Passivhaus’ standard for the Scottish volume housing market” (https://rgu-repository.worktribe.com/output/1254972) and “Heritage Way” (https://rgu-repository.worktribe.com/output/1254884).

Prof. Gokay Deveci (SSS) – Link to other outputs on OpenAIR

So, if you are a practice-based researcher and want to discuss how we can help you to make your creative outputs open access, just get in touch with the Publications Team!

References:

Minigame

Today’s minigame is a memory puzzle, where you flip over cards to find duplicates. If you flip over two cards and the images don’t match, then they return to being face-down, so you will need to remember where those images were! In this case, all of the images are related to open research at RGU. You can access the game here: https://puzzel.org/en/memory/play?p=-Mk1eM3P1UQ7CC3G60dK

Open Access Week 2021: Refresher on OA

Welcome to the first of five posts this week celebrating International Open Access Week 2021. This year each of the daily blogs will also include a link to an “Open Access” themed minigame or puzzle. Please feel free to share these daily posts and games with anyone that you think might enjoy them! Today’s puzzle is a crossword, which can be found here: https://puzzel.org/en/crossword/play?p=-MlEi3ylaChm0Yv-Uutd. Remember to check back each day to see the new blog post and to discover what games we have devised for you…

Refresher on Open Access at RGU

Perhaps you are you are an early career researcher or perhaps you have just joined RGU – or perhaps you are an “old hand” who would just like a quick refresher on some key things to consider before publishing? If so, then we hope the following points will be useful reminders for you:

  • Notify the Publications Team. Once you’ve been notified that a publisher has accepted your work for publication, forward their email to the Publications Team, along with a copy of the Author Accepted Manuscript (AAM). Most outputs produced by researchers at RGU must be deposited on our repository, OpenAIR, within three months of the acceptance date. It is therefore very important that you either add your new output to Worktribe (our research information system) yourself or notify the Publications Team as soon as possible, so that we can add it to OpenAIR for you before the deadline.
  • Author Accepted Manuscripts. Unless you have published your work as Gold Open Access on the publisher’s website, publishers will generally permit you to use only the AAM on OpenAIR. The AAM is the version of your work at the time of acceptance – i.e. after peer review, but before any copyediting has been done and before any publisher formatting or details have been added. “Proof” copies are not typically considered acceptable by publishers, because they usually contain publisher additions to the AAM. Your AAM should also include any separate tables or figures. When you send your AAM to the Publications Team, we will make sure that it meets the publisher’s requirements before we upload it to OpenAIR.
  • Check funder requirements. If your output is the result of a project that involves external grants, the funder may require open access – either through self-archiving on OpenAIR or through publishing Gold Open Access. Sherpa Juliet is a useful database that contains updated information about the policies of various funders.
  • Creative Commons licences. Selecting the correct Creative Commons (CC) licence is very important, especially if your funder requires a specific licence. When publishing Gold Open Access, you may be given a choice of CC licences. In general, we strongly recommend RGU researchers to select a Creative Commons Attribution licence (CC BY). This is one of the most open CC licences, which allows people to reuse your material as long as they give you appropriate credit. Selecting this licence will help to ensure that your work has maximum impact and is compliant with all current funder policies – it is therefore also the best value for money when paying to publish. If you would like more information about other CC licences, check out our online guide on open licensing.
  • Linking outputs to projects. If your output is the result of a research project that has a record on Worktribe, remember to link the output to the project on the “Funders” tab of the output record in Worktribe. If you are unable to do this yourself, get in touch with the Publications Team and we will be happy to do this on your behalf. This helps to ensure that the output will display on the project’s OpenAIR webpage.

OpenAIR@RGU – monthly update (no.57 – September 2021)

Welcome to the latest update on RGU’s open access institutional repository, OpenAIR. If you have any suggestions for things that you would like to see in these monthly updates, or if you have any questions about the repository service, please get in touch with the Publications Team.

News

We will be celebrating International Open Access Week during the final week of October. Keep an eye out for a special series of blog posts during that week, which will highlight various aspects of open research and the OpenAIR repository service at RGU!

As a reminder, please get in touch with us at publications@rgu.ac.uk if you would like to arrange a training session (or refresher) on how to add your outputs to Worktribe.

Content

OpenAIR currently contains 4847 outputs. Some examples of recent additions to the repository include the following:

  • https://rgu-repository.worktribe.com/output/1472472 = GIL, S., FILHO, W.F., SHINJO, S.K., FERRIOLLI, E., BUSSE, A.L., AVELINO-SILVA, T.J., LONGOBARDI, I., DE OLIVEIRA JÚNIOR, G.N., SWINTON, P., GUALANO, B., ROSCHEL, H. and the HCFMUSP COVID-19 Study Group. 2021. Muscle strength and muscle mass as predictors of hospital length of stay in patients with moderate to severe COVID-19: a prospective observational study. Journal of cachexia, sarcopenia and muscle [online], Early View. Available from: https://doi.org/10.1002/jcsm.12789

Each School is currently linked to the following number of outputs on OpenAIR:

(Click image to expand)

Aberdeen Business School – 675
Gray’s School of Art – 299
Law School – 202
School of Applied Social Studies – 203
School of Computing – 647
School of Creative and Cultural Business – 520
School of Engineering – 744
School of Health Sciences – 238
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Paramedic Practice – 368
School of Pharmacy and Life Sciences – 776
Scott Sutherland School of Architecture and Built Environment – 332
National Subsea Centre – 32
Other departments – 47

Downloads

Last month, in August, there were a total of 4733 downloads from OpenAIR. The most-downloaded items were:

The above data were gathered on 29.09.2021.

OpenAIR@RGU – monthly update (no.56 – August 2021)

Welcome to the latest update on RGU’s open access institutional repository, OpenAIR. If you have any suggestions for things that you would like to see in these monthly updates, or if you have any questions about the repository service, please get in touch with the Publications Team.

News

Please get in touch with us at publications@rgu.ac.uk if you would like to arrange a training session (or refresher) on how to add your outputs to Worktribe.

As a reminder, when you are looking to publish your journal articles, you may want to take advantage of one of the library’s Gold Open Access offsetting agreements, which can help to reduce or entirely cover the costs of publishing Gold Open Access. The full list and details of our current deals are available in our online guide.

Content

OpenAIR currently contains 4766 outputs. Some examples of recent additions to the repository include the following:

  • https://rgu-repository.worktribe.com/output/1400355 = BELKOURI, D., LAING, R. and GRAY, D. [2021]. Through the eyes of autonomous vehicles: using laser scanning technology to engage the public via the analysis of journeys seen from a different perspective. Transportation research procedia [online]: proceedings of 25th Living and walking in cities international conference 2021 (LWC 2021): new scenarios for safe mobility in urban areas, 9-10 September 2021, Brescia, Italy, (accepted).

Each School is currently linked to the following number of outputs on OpenAIR:

(Click image to expand)

Aberdeen Business School – 670
Gray’s School of Art – 297
Law School – 199
School of Applied Social Studies – 201
School of Computing – 628
School of Creative and Cultural Business – 516
School of Engineering – 721
School of Health Sciences – 230
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Paramedic Practice – 365
School of Pharmacy and Life Sciences – 763
Scott Sutherland School of Architecture and Built Environment – 327
Other departments – 69

Downloads

Last month, in July, there were a total of 4333 downloads from OpenAIR. The most-downloaded items were:

The above data were gathered on 30.08.2021.

OpenAIR@RGU – monthly update (no.55 – July 2021)

Welcome to the latest update on RGU’s open access institutional repository, OpenAIR. If you have any suggestions for things that you would like to see in these monthly updates, or if you have any questions about the repository service, please get in touch with the Publications Team.

News

Please get in touch with us at publications@rgu.ac.uk if you would like to arrange a training session (or refresher) on how to add your outputs to Worktribe.

As a reminder, when you are looking to publish your journal articles, you may want to take advantage of one of the library’s Gold Open Access offsetting agreements, which can help to reduce or entirely cover the costs of publishing Gold Open Access. The full list and details of our current deals are available in our online guide.

Content

OpenAIR currently contains 4686 outputs. Some examples of recent additions to the repository include the following:

Each School is currently linked to the following number of outputs on OpenAIR:

(Click image to expand)

Aberdeen Business School – 668
Gray’s School of Art – 292
Law School – 198
School of Applied Social Studies – 194
School of Computing – 611
School of Creative and Cultural Business – 503
School of Engineering – 714
School of Health Sciences – 218
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Paramedic Practice – 359
School of Pharmacy and Life Sciences – 753
Scott Sutherland School of Architecture and Built Environment – 322
Other departments – 61

Downloads

Last month, in June, there were a total of 4045 downloads from OpenAIR. The most-downloaded items were:

The above data were gathered on 22.07.2021.

OpenAIR@RGU – monthly update (no.54 – June 2021)

Welcome to the latest update on RGU’s open access institutional repository, OpenAIR. If you have any suggestions for things that you would like to see in these monthly updates, or if you have any questions about the repository service, please get in touch with the Publications Team.

News

Happy Pride Month! We hope that everyone is enjoying the (generally) warmer weather and looking forward to a break over the summer. Many of you may want to use the break from teaching to focus more on your research and we are happy to help in whatever way we can. In particular, please get in touch with us at publications@rgu.ac.uk if you would like to arrange a training session (or refresher) on how to add your outputs to Worktribe.

As a reminder, when you are looking to publish your journal articles, you may want to take advantage of one of the library’s Gold Open Access offsetting agreements, which can help to reduce or entirely cover the costs of publishing Gold Open Access. The full list and details of our current deals are available in our online guide.

Content

OpenAIR currently contains 4623 outputs. Some examples of recent additions to the repository include the following:

Each School is currently linked to the following number of outputs on OpenAIR:

(Click image to expand)

Aberdeen Business School – 663
Gray’s School of Art – 286
Law School – 198
School of Applied Social Studies – 194
School of Computing – 602
School of Creative and Cultural Business – 501
School of Engineering – 692
School of Health Sciences – 218
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Paramedic Practice – 354
School of Pharmacy and Life Sciences – 741
Scott Sutherland School of Architecture and Built Environment – 320
Other departments – 59

Downloads

Last month, in May, there were a total of 4045 downloads from OpenAIR. The most-downloaded items were:

The above data were gathered on 29.06.2021.

OpenAIR@RGU – monthly update (no.53 – May 2021)

Welcome to the latest update on RGU’s open access institutional repository, OpenAIR. If you have any suggestions for things that you would like to see in these monthly updates, or if you have any questions about the repository service, please get in touch with the Publications Team.

News

Each month the Publications Team run a group training session that explains how to record outputs in Worktribe and OpenAIR. If you would like to be invited to a session, please email us (publications@rgu.ac.uk).

Content

OpenAIR currently contains 4533 outputs. Some examples of recent additions to the repository include the following:

Each School is currently linked to the following number of outputs on OpenAIR:

(Click image to expand)

Aberdeen Business School – 656
Gray’s School of Art – 273
Law School – 197
School of Applied Social Studies – 192
School of Computing – 596
School of Creative and Cultural Business – 495
School of Engineering – 670
School of Health Sciences – 213
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Paramedic Practice – 345
School of Pharmacy and Life Sciences – 721
Scott Sutherland School of Architecture and Built Environment – 319
Other departments – 54

Downloads

Last month, in April, there were a total of 5002 downloads from OpenAIR. The most-downloaded items were:

  • http://hdl.handle.net/10059/1030 = IBRAHIM, I.A. 2014. A theoretical and empirical investigation of the barriers to the adoption of state-of-the-art information systems by Nigerian indigenous oil companies. Robert Gordon University, PhD thesis.

The above data were gathered on 26.05.2021.

OpenAIR@RGU – monthly update (no.52 – April 2021)

Welcome to the latest update on RGU’s open access institutional repository, OpenAIR. If you have any suggestions for things that you would like to see in these monthly updates, or if you have any questions about the repository service, please get in touch with the Publications Team.

News

Each month we are running an online group training session on how to record outputs in Worktribe. If you would like to be invited to a training session, please send an e-mail to the Publications Team (publications@rgu.ac.uk).

Content

OpenAIR currently contains 4473 outputs. Some examples of recent additions to the repository include the following:

Each School is currently linked to the following number of outputs on OpenAIR:

(Click image to expand)
Aberdeen Business School – 655
Gray’s School of Art – 271
Law School – 196
School of Applied Social Studies – 183
School of Computing – 591
School of Creative and Cultural Business – 486
School of Engineering – 666
School of Health Sciences – 211
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Paramedic Practice – 338
School of Pharmacy and Life Sciences – 705
Scott Sutherland School of Architecture and Built Environment – 314
Other departments – 49

Downloads

Last month, in March, there were a total of 4993 downloads from OpenAIR. The most-downloaded items were:

The above data were gathered on 28.04.2021.