10 Tips for Writing a Truly Terrible Journal Article

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Webinar 1 March at 2-3 pm GMT / 3-4 pm CET / 9-10 am EST

Learning how not to write an article is as important as learning how to write it! In this webinar Bert Blocken highlights 10 tips of what to avoid when writing your article. What to avoid includes taking the lazy route of plagiarism, overestimating your contribution and ignoring comments from editors and reviewers. Many of these “tips to avoid” may appear obvious but are pitfalls that even the most seasoned of authors can fall into. The webinar will demonstrate how a poorly written article can ruin the career of a researcher.

The presenter Prof. dr. ir. Bert Blocken is a Civil Engineer, holding a PhD in Building Physics. He is Full Professor in the Department of the Built Environment at Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) in the Netherlands and part-time Full Professor in the Department of Civil Engineering at KU Leuven in Belgium. Bert has published 128 articles in international peer-reviewed journals and is among the 150 most-cited researchers worldwide both in the field of Civil Engineering and in the field of Energy Science & Engineering. Further, Bert is an Editor of Building & Environment and Associate Editor of Wind Engineering & Industrial Aerodynamics. He has acted as a reviewer for more than 70 different journals.

Follow this link to register.

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Systematic Review Course, 26-29 June 2017, University of Cardiff

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This is an intensive four-day course introducing the skills necessary to complete a systematic review. The course will cover:

  • introduction to systematic reviewing and developing a protocol
  • literature searching and selection of studies
  • critical appraisal of quantitative and qualitative data
  • extracting data – developing/adapting forms
  • meta-analysis or narrative synthesis
  • reporting and dissemination of qualitative data.

More information and links to register interest available here.

 

Open access in the Research Excellence Framework: Extension of flexibility

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The four UK higher education funding bodies have decided to extend the initial flexibility in the Open Access (OA) policy for a further year, recognising the timetable for the next REF with results in 2021. The requirement that outputs be deposited on acceptance will commence after Sunday 1 April 2018, subject to a review of the readiness of systems within the sector in autumn 2017.

In the announcement yesterday, 15 November (SFC/AN/14/2016), Stuart Fancey, Scottish Funding Council Director of Research and Innovation wrote:

“We are pleased with the progress so far, but we recognise the challenges involved in driving the policy centrally. As previously announced, for the first year of the policy (from 1 April 2016 to 1 April 2017), we are providing a degree of flexibility to allow time for higher education institutions (HEIs), Jisc and others to develop tools to allow information about publications to flow better between researchers and administrators. During that period of flexibility, HEIs may deposit outputs in their repositories within three months of publication, rather than of acceptance, which provides a longer window for securing author engagement. Many HEIs have nonetheless continued to implement our ‘deposit on acceptance’ policy and are seeing academic engagement increase significantly, and excellent progress has been made to build new relationships between HEIs and publishers in pursuit of the UK’s OA goals.

In Open access in the next Research Excellence Framework: policy adjustments and qualifications (HEFCE Circular letter 20/2015, www.hefce.ac.uk/pubs/Year/2015/CL,202015/), institutions were advised that the funding bodies would work with them in autumn 2016 to review the developing arrangements, and to determine whether remaining technical gaps had been sufficiently addressed to end the flexibility in April 2017. In the intervening period, the Minister for Universities and Science asked Lord Stern to review the REF, and to allow time for this, the timetable has been realigned so that results of the next REF would be announced in December 2021. The four higher education funding bodies will now work together to develop proposals on how to implement Lord Stern’s recommendations in the next REF. We expect to launch a consultation with the sector on these proposals in November 2016 and we are conscious that our original plan to review progress on OA in autumn 2016 may collide unhelpfully with the consultation on the REF. We therefore want to allow HEIs longer to improve systems and fine-tune approaches. The REF 2021 timeframe will provide HEIs with a further year to embed open access activities and to work with us to develop the shape of the next REF.

In light of the above, we are therefore making the following adjustments to our OA policy:

  • The policy continues to require that, to be eligible for submission to the REF, outputs must be deposited within three months of acceptance for publication, but we now plan that this requirement will apply to outputs accepted after Sunday 1 April 2018. We will review the readiness of systems with the sector in autumn 2017.
  • Outputs accepted between 1 April 2016 and 1 April 2018 must be deposited within three months of publication.”

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Wellcome Open Submissions – Open for Business

wellcomeYou can now submit to Wellcome Open Research a new publishing platform. The platform aims to make research outputs available faster, and to support reproducibility and transparency. Wellcome researchers can use the platform to publish a wide range of submissions, from more traditional narrative-based articles to incremental findings, methods, protocols, datasets and negative/null results. Once uploaded, submissions pass through transparent invited peer review and deposited in PubMed Central and Europe PMC.  Wellcome Open Research is designed to be author driven.

RGU research presented at RICS COBRA conference

RGU was represented at the recent RICS COBRA research conference, held in Toronto and hosted by George Brown College. COBRA is the annual international construction, building and real estate conference run by the RICS, which in recent years has travelled to the USA, India, Australia and France, and which will return to the UK in 2017.

Research presented by Professor Richard Laing included a paper concerning our use of HD laser scanning in Elgin, as part of the Castle to Cathedral to Cashmere project. The paper (co-authored with Elizabeth Tait, Marianthi Leon, John Isaacs and Peter Reid) looked at the application of architectural visualisation in a heritage-led regeneration project, and connected well with a series of keynote talks (emerging pervasive ICT, BIM and smart buildings).

Among the other papers were excellent presentations on community-led upgrading (by Claudia Loggia and Christina Georgiadou from the University of Westminster) and a fascinating study of online teaching and learning in architecture and construction, including design (by Heather Bibbings, Stephen Austin and Amela Bogdanovic, from the University of Coventry).

The conference commenced with a tour of the renovated historic ‘distillery district’ led by students of George Brown, and concluded with a visit to the George Brown BIM Lab.

Wellcome Trust – Open Access Policy

Wellcome this week has published a set of requirements for open access publications, which will come into force next spring.

The policy deals with many issues including whether Wellcome will pay for publishing costs,  uploading articles to PubMed Central (PMC),  and publishing content under a Creative Commons Attribution Licence (CC BY) .

Neil Jacobs, head of scholarly communications support at Jisc, notes: “It is incredibly helpful to have a funder of Wellcome’s standing be so clear about its expectations in this area.  APCs already constitute a multi-million pound market, which makes it important that everyone is clear about what is being paid for.” More from JISC here.

This policy will come into effect on 1 April 2017. Wiley, SpringerNature, OUP, Royal Society and PLOS, who publish almost 50% of Wellcome funded research outcomes, have all committed to signing up to the requirements. Charity Open Access Fund (COAF) members Cancer Research UK, British Heart Foundation and Parkinson’s UK will all set the same requirements for outcomes of research they have funded. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation will also be introducing the requirements when their open access mandate is launched in January 2017

Increase and evidence the impact of your published work

KUDOS webinar

Kudos Educational Researcher Webinar – Wednesday 31st August 2016

Co-hosted with Kudos, Altmetric, ORCID and Thomson Reuters, this session will give you hints and tips on how to promote your work effectively, measure current reach and how to further increase the impact of your work (reach, altmetrics and citations) – all in one place.

Find out more and register here – http://bit.ly/kudoswebinaraug2016

Any questions, please do email support@growkudos.com who will happily help.

 

Depositing Research Outputs: Getting more from OpenAIR

imagesRGU has its own institutional repository for research outputs called “OpenAIR”.  Depositing research outputs in OpenAIR meets many Open Access requirements and, because the repository is optimised for search engines, it can raise the profile of research staff and students.  To improve the level of service support offered to researchers and research students, a new policy has been approved. As a result, OpenAIR is now accepting submissions of many more kinds of research output, including research data, systematic review protocols and any outputs created by doctoral and research masters students. If you would like to find out more, get in touch with the OpenAIR team, or read the full policy.”

 

Which publications best reflect your research achievements?

HEFFCE blog 20 July

This is one of the questions addressed in a post today by Jonathan Adams on the HEFCE blog. In the post Jonathan explores some of the findings published in the HEFCE report “Publication patterns in research underpinning impact in REF2014” that we have previously referred to on Research Matters.

Read Jonathan’s blog post here then follow on with Anna Lang’s blog piece about the REF Impact Case Studies

If you are thinking ahead to the next REF and considering impact stories you could do worse than explore the searchable database of impact case studies submitted for REF 2014 that HEFCE have helpfully provided.